Phone: 727-397-5571

How can I prove undue influence in a will contest case?

Woman Having an Intense Discussion With an Elderly WomanIll or elderly people are at high risk of being taken advantage of by scammers, petty thieves, or even those closest to them. Sometimes, an individual may manipulate a senior into changing their will, rerouting assets to the individual instead of the senior's proper heirs. When this happens, relatives may contest the will in probate court after a senior's death in order to have the will ruled invalid.

What Is Undue Influence?

Physical or mental incapacity can make a loved one extremely susceptible to elder exploitation. If someone unethically pressures a senior into changing their will for personal gain, the will can be contested based on undue influence.

In general, a successful undue influence case proves that:

  • The will left property in an unexpected way. This usually means that close family members have been cut out of the will to the benefit of another party. As you may imagine, it can be difficult to prove what your loved one’s wishes are after their death. Correspondence from your loved one referring to certain items (such as “when you have my engagement ring,” or “I want that house to stay in the family”) or similar testimony can help prove true intent.
  • The influencer had a confidential relationship with your loved one. Anyone who has close contact with a senior could build a bond of trust to exert influence, such as a former spouse, distant relative, or a caretaker. Testimony from doctors, lawyers, relatives, and others can be helpful in demonstrating the nature of the relationship between the influencer and the deceased.
  • Your loved one was in a vulnerable position. In many cases, a loved one may be suffering from dementia or other condition that impairs their mental capacity. An influencer may further alienate a victim by preventing other family members from visiting or lying to nursing home staff.
  • The influencer improperly benefited from the will. Not all influences qualify as improper influences. An attorney may suggest certain changes to a will for the benefit of the heirs, and a spouse might push a dying loved one to alter an out-of-date will. The court will have to decide whether the influence caused an unfair distribution of assets.

If you suspect your departed relative was pressured to change their will, Florida estate litigation attorneys at DeLoach, Hofstra & Cavonis can explain your legal options. Simply fill out the quick contact form on this page to set up a consultation and get answers to your questions.

 

Announcement

Due to Hurricane Ian, our offices will be closed from Tuesday, September 27 to Thursday, September 29. If you need help, please private message us on our Facebook page or through the contact form on our website. We are monitoring both very closely. Thank you for your understanding and please stay safe! Please visit our Facebook page for updates.

X